Building my own bunker

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Left4Dad 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #2041

    Left4Dad
    Member

    I want to build a bunker. Not only because it is the EOW thing to do, but also because I believe that living underground is smarter than heating and cooling a house all year long. I have looked at lots of plans and how to books and jerked off to the radiusengineering.com web site about a million times, but instead I think I want to build poured concrete structures.

    My plan is to build a concrete mold for a fair sized room. Every time I get some money and can afford rebar and a truckfull of concrete, I can add a new room. Add plumbing for bathrooms, electrical for living rooms. I’d have standard tunnel molds so I could set those up and pour the hallway quickly. It’d all be modular, like sections on the space station.

    Since I am a sucky carpenter, I could always just pay a real concrete company to build me a mold properly. I am surprised that the tornado shelters are all as expensive as they are. Seems like there should be a practical way to build decent bomb shelters for a lot less than you see on the market now. Radius is totally eyecandy, but their shelters cost $$$$$$$.

    Anybody ever do any poured concrete molds?

    #17907

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    I’ve also heard of people using just long piece of big bore pipe running underneath the ground into a basement with a fan in front that pulls radiant temps around 68F to reduce heating & cooling cost all year round.

    #17919

    Left4Dad
    Member

    Yep you can, but once you floor it out you lose much of your volume. You can use the space below as storage, but now you are stooping to walk. I want something that won’t induce cabin fever right away. Concrete pipes are good for escape tunnels, underground ranges, and tornado bunkers. Short term. I want something that my family could live in long term without killing each other.

    I have watched how they assemble the poured sections of the highway and it really is a neat engineering trick. A guy I worked with did some amazing things with poured and stained (and polished) concrete. I am still studying concrete trying to figure out what type would best suit the conditons and be flexible enough to survive a major earthquake.

    #17918

    alwayscross
    Member

    If you look on youtube there are loads of videos on how to do it, my favourite is were they use shipping containers. Its easy but I don’t know about how much it would cost. The containers would provide a very good shell.

    #17921

    tick
    Member

    I’ve been thinking about it but where I live you get a couple of feet of soil and then it’s massive rock. So I discarded the idea.
    Anyway, from what I have read and heard shipping containers are built in such a way that they are incredibly strong, they do stack them high and heavy on ships and such, but they are only that strong on the corners. If you put large amounts of weight on the thin metal that is the shell of the container it wont withstand very well. Maybe you could reinforce it somewhat? Or just go old school and use concrete and reinforce with steel from your local junkyard. My bet is it would be cheaper in the end and save you many hours of work. And you get some artistic freedom in the design.

    Sent using Tapatalk for Android

    #17908

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    On a lot of jobs I work in construction shipping containers are used for tool rooms, bolts & gasket storage and what not. I remember a few years ago being on a job in which the company safety meeting covered the removal of all the pallets of blinds stacked on top of a certain shipping container. Before that day I never payed much attention to how much crap had been stacked on top but it a large amount of large size isolation blinds certainly a safety concern but my point is it was holding a significant amount of weight not supported by the outer edges and had been for a period of months.

    I do believe the steel used on those shipping containers are about 3/16″ which is pretty strong in the design with the high/low channels. If it had been a solid flat piece of plate even 1/4″ thick I’m certain it’d be much weaker.

    #17922

    tick
    Member

    @teknabuzz 17121 wrote:

    On a lot of jobs I work in construction shipping containers are used for tool rooms, bolts & gasket storage and what not. I remember a few years ago being on a job in which the company safety meeting covered the removal of all the pallets of blinds stacked on top of a certain shipping container. Before that day I never payed much attention to how much crap had been stacked on top but it a large amount of large size isolation blinds certainly a safety concern but my point is it was holding a significant amount of weight not supported by the outer edges and had been for a period of months.

    I do believe the steel used on those shipping containers are about 3/16″ which is pretty strong in the design with the high/low channels. If it had been a solid flat piece of plate even 1/4″ thick I’m certain it’d be much weaker.

    Have you tried putting a couple of tons of gravel and dirt on one? Me neither. But I saw and episode of Mythbusters (VERY scientific research has been done as you see ;);) and they where covering on above ground with dry sand and it collapsed. Imagine the water being collected in the material when it rains.
    And if it’s a bunker I guess it should withstand some added pressure and vibration to not just be a cellar.
    Pressure will be from all directions when dug down. If you stack on top the walls themselves hold massive weight. Take a peice of paper and hold i out in different angles and you will understand how I think.

    Sent using Tapatalk for Android

    #17909

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    @tick 17122 wrote:

    Have you tried putting a couple of tons of gravel and dirt on one? Me neither. But I saw and episode of Mythbusters (VERY scientific research has been done as you see ;);) and they where covering on above ground with dry sand and it collapsed. Imagine the water being collected in the material when it rains.
    And if it’s a bunker I guess it should withstand some added pressure and vibration to not just be a cellar.
    Pressure will be from all directions when dug down. If you stack on top the walls themselves hold massive weight. Take a peice of paper and hold i out in different angles and you will understand how I think.

    Sent using Tapatalk for Android

    Yeah, I was in no way suggesting they could withstand being buried in fact I think I advised against this once before in one of these threads on here. Even a foot of wet topsoil would weigh tons and it would rust out quick. Just was saying the shipping containers are actually pretty strong.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

    #17920

    Left4Dad
    Member

    Shipping containers can be used for berm houses, but then ya might as well live in a trailer.

    A character in Calizona built brick revetments to put his shipping containers in, then covered them with telephone poles covered with earth. That way the walls support the roof, not the shipping container, and the walls keep the dirt from crushing the containers. Telephone poles are cheap or even free. They are deemed hazmat because of the creosote they are dipped in, so companies are often glad to give them away for free. I have a freind who gets them delivered for free. Its cheaper than paying for hazmat disposal.

    Nope, i want a poured concrete bunker like this one: http://www.calizona.us/camelot.jpg
    With this one attached: http://www.calizona.us/Ashley‘sBlackMesa.jpg

    #17912

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    That bunker is over the top. I think some people would be happy to have a house that size above ground 🙂

    #17915

    Andrew
    Moderator

    Very cool but not attainable for most folks.

    #17910

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    I don’t know how much they run but at work they use blast proof buildings which more or less reinforced shipping containers. I’m sure there is many different manufacturers of these buildings but on my current job they get their buildings from this place:
    https://redguard.com/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uart4RflGOc

    Couldn’t find a source for it but a few years ago I was on a job where our lunch/break room was a double wide trailer looking blast proof building.

    #17911

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    Today at work I volunteered to come in to help the rigging dept who was setting blast proof buildings made by the redguard company I mentioned before who had a team of guys there but didn’t do much. Each section of the control room/shelter building is the size of a normal shipping container with seemingly similar exterior construction but it heavily reinforced each weighing about 68,000lbs each. Kind of goes together like a double wide trailer except the building is bolted together and the one we did today was a total of 7 sections. Wish I could have gotten a pic.

    #17913

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    So I had my septic tank pumped out, i had to jump down into it (fun) after it was empty and check a few things. Then I said “humm, this could make an excellent bunker and no one would know any better as to what you where up to.”

    No clue if it’s a good idea or not, but it’s an idea.

    #17916

    Andrew
    Moderator

    That is a bit nasty.

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