Middle East – Tensions High Official Thread

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This topic contains 72 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  PhilTheBiker 3 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 73 total)
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  • #11863

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    I don’t trust Syria or the ‘rebels’ that are trying to take over Syria.

    #11900

    JulioTheSavage
    Moderator

    @philthebiker 9265 wrote:

    I don’t trust Syria or the ‘rebels’ that are trying to take over Syria.

    I completely agree with you.

    #11864

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    So i wrote my Senators asking them to stop funding this type of aid. Senator Barbara Mulkulsi’s response was not acceptable to me. It was just a standard ‘form’ that some aid sent as quickly as they could. Senator Carden’s response appeared to be much more thought out. Here was his response.

    Dear Mr. [PhilTheBiker]:

    Thank you for writing to me to express your concerns about continued foreign assistance to the Egyptian government. This is a difficult situation and I share many of your concerns.

    Egypt remains in the middle of a complex political transition that could have far-reaching implications for the Arab World—as historically what happens in Egypt influences developments elsewhere in the region. Egypt’s recent transition to democracy offers us an important opportunity to help shape the country’s future as a democratic, prosperous, stable and thriving regional leader in the Middle East and North Africa.

    One of the challenges we face in Egypt and elsewhere is that the newly emerging democracies in the region take on more populist complexions as new governments strive to respond to public opinion in ways that previous regimes did not. In Egypt, this means overcoming widely shared though ill-founded suspicions of U.S. intentions and increased sensitivity to perceived foreign interference.

    There has been a recurring debate in the Senate about whether to cut or condition U.S. assistance to Egypt, particularly in light of Egypt’s slow response to the attack on the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. The Senate’s FY2013 State and Foreign Operations Appropriation Bill, S.3241, would provide Egypt with $1.3 billion in military aid and approximately $250 million in economic aid. I am concerned that ending all U.S. assistance to Egypt would not only diminish regional stability, but would harm America’s short and long-term interests. Cutting assistance would dramatically reduce our ability to influence events at a pivotal moment in Egypt’s history and could jeopardize Egypt’s relationship with Israel, a pillar of regional security for the last three decades. Aside from military assistance, supporting Egypt’s economic stabilization and growth is also a strategic interest because without progress in these areas, the resulting economic and political vacuum would open the door for renewed instability and ultimately would diminish chances for regional peace and security. At the same time, we must insist on accountability for our foreign assistance.

    It is critically important that the Egyptian government is working with us to bring peace and stability to the region. President Morsi has publicly affirmed his intention to respect Egypt’s international treaty commitments, including the 1979 Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty. Preserving peace and security is vital to Egypt’s interests and to its efforts to stabilize its economy, attract investment and tourism, and increase economic opportunity for its people.

    The U.S. has made clear to Egypt that in a democracy, those who win the majority of votes have the right to govern but also the responsibility to protect the rights of all citizens. As we pursue efforts to assist Egypt economically, we intend to keep front and center core U.S. interests in democratization. These interests include the development of an inclusive, democratic system of governance where the rights of all Egyptians – men, women, and people of all faiths– are respected. Protecting the rights of all Egyptians, particularly the right to free speech, will create a more open society, build international confidence in Egypt, and foster increased opportunity that will advance Egypt’s economic goals and democratic growth.

    I recognize that our relationship with Egypt, including our assistance package, may have to be reassessed in the years to come. But protecting and advancing core U.S. interests in this new environment will require a patient, pragmatic, and strategic approach that focuses on shared interests and seeks to build relationships with Egypt’s new leaders.

    As a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and Chairman of the International Development and Foreign Assistance Subcommittee, I want to assure you that I am monitoring the situation in Egypt closely, and am working to ensure that every taxpayer dollar spent abroad promotes America’s national interests.

    Thank you for contacting my office. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future on this or any matter of concern to you.

    While I don’t fully agree with where he stands, I certainly appreciate a more detailed response than the other senator.

    #11840

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    @juliothesavage 9264 wrote:

    I don’t trust Eygpt at all. They will take our money then stab us in the back. Muslim nations don’t like us. Who’s to say that some of this money doesn’t funnel into terrorist groups?

    The rebels are just another terrorist group and I think its funny that we’re not even trying to hid it by using terms like freedom fighters anymore. Chances are we will one day label these same rebels as an active enemy on the war on terror but for now as Senator Carden pointed out in his reply to Phil we’re using the rebels for short and long term interest. We did the same thing with the Taliban to fight off the Russians.

    @philthebiker 9340 wrote:

    So i wrote my Senators asking them to stop funding this type of aid. Senator Barbara Mulkulsi’s response was not acceptable to me. It was just a standard ‘form’ that some aid sent as quickly as they could. Senator Carden’s response appeared to be much more thought out. Here was his response.

    While I don’t fully agree with where he stands, I certainly appreciate a more detailed response than the other senator.

    Phil,

    I think its great you wrote your senators, I’ve never wrote a politician but I admire you for taking to heart to do such a thing. I remember my dad had wrote George H. Bush during first Gulf War and I don’t know the contents or reason for the letter because my dad wasn’t very outspoken on politics but I remember dad getting a reply back with a letter he framed and a signed picture of GHB.

    #11865

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20779388

    Two polio vaccination workers have been killed in north-western Pakistan in the latest of a spate of deadly attacks.

    Lot of brave people try to help other people every year. Why would these health workers go to Pakistan. Passion for life. They are now dead because the people whom they tried to help saw them as a threat. Very sad.

    #11841

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    @philthebiker 9365 wrote:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20779388

    Lot of brave people try to help other people every year. Why would these health workers go to Pakistan. Passion for life. They are now dead because the people whom they tried to help saw them as a threat. Very sad.

    Probably has nothing to do with it but we used a doctor in Pakistan to go into the Bin Laden compound using vaccinations as a excuse to get inside which provided us with video footage using a hidden cam before we raided the compound. Or at least thats what I seen on T.V.

    #11901

    JulioTheSavage
    Moderator

    (Reuters) – Syria protested to the United Nations on Thursday over an Israeli air strike on its territory and warned of a possible “surprise” response.
    Syria protests over Israel attack, warns of surprise | Reuters

    #11866

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    @juliothesavage 11001 wrote:

    (Reuters) – Syria protested to the United Nations on Thursday over an Israeli air strike on its territory and warned of a possible “surprise” response.
    Syria protests over Israel attack, warns of surprise | Reuters

    I think Syria has enough internal problems to not take on an insurrection / Civil War and a conflict with Israel. I’m sure happy we don’t live in a high strung area like the middle east. Sure we have our own problems, and yeah, maybe someday we’ll have issues like this, but I’m going to enjoy the freedom today that I have!

    #11867

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    So the Syrian Rebels are backed by Al Queda and the US is arming the Syrian Rebels. Iran is working with the Assad government and now Russia says the United States is violating the law if we impose a no fly zone.

    Russia: US no-fly zone over Syria would be illegal – Worthy News

    Who exactly is going to enforce that law that Obama plans on breaking and what does that mean for us? Great. I’m going back to my homestead, click on my youtube link next to my profile image on the left and enjoy the videos 🙂

    #11842

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    Was going to make a new thread but figured I’d just bump this one since it has a lot of information in regards to how things have progressed to where we are at now. I am wondering what is everybody’s thoughts on the latest with Syria.

    Do you believe that the Syrian Government (Assad) really used chemical weapons?

    Or do you think it staged by the rebels to get our involvement. LOL, I know how complex the conspiracy theories can get and that’s just sugar coating it.

    What do you think the correct course of action should be?

    Here’s some of my thoughts on the issue. At this point I do believe it’s likely that Assad used chemical weapons, after all its been an ongoing dirty civil war for quite some time. Now what we should do about it if anything is a tough call cause either way its bad for us but I do have a slight lean toward military action only because we’ve created thru past foreign policies that in reality is our way of fighting battles with other world powers such as Russia in this case through the means of diplomacy.

    I wish we would’ve been doing things differently way back many decades ago but we went the route that we have and now the entire world is a problem that is just as dangerous to ignore as it is to get involved despite the fact we can’t even fix the problems we have here at home.

    I don’t think taking any form of military action will widely be support by the populous unless another more earth shattering event takes place beforehand, but I do believe that the current administration is going to make sure that some form of limited military action takes place. I think Syria is the road to Iran but the frightening thing is could easily escalate into a major conflict in the middle east if do strike Syria.

    It’s very complicated to say the least, it’s way past my bed time so I’ll leave it there for now.

    #11856

    Alonso1
    Moderator

    @philthebiker 9149 wrote:

    I realize others have a different point of view than me, and I’m ok with that. On the flip side, I hope you join me when it comes to shooting the blue helmets off the heads of foreigners that someday could come to our country.

    I’m with you.

    #11868

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    I’m tired of us arming the middle east when some states around here won’t even allow people to carry a gun.

    I’m tired of us sending billions of tax payer aid to far off countries when we have our own hungry people, run down schools, broken down bridge, and such. How many years of healthcare could this ‘war’ in Syria fund?

    I think Chemical weapons where used, but I also think they may have been used by either side.

    Finally all I have to say is, If we take out Assad will Syria be as stable as the other countries that we’ve toppled leaders in? As safe as Iraq, as safe as Afghanistan.

    The only people that want war are the people that build the bombs. Cruise missiles, $1+ million per launch.

    #11905

    firemedic4
    Member

    Those people have been fighting themselves for thousands of years! Does anyone think sending our boys to die over there will make a difference? Muslims kill each other over different ways to interpret their stupid book!! The muslim religion is NOT condusive to freedom, besides they hate the US. Professional politicans have been talking about the “Middle East peace talks” for how freakin’ long? No such thing.

    #11843

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    I agree with the concerns and points made but I really think it’s far more complicated than to just let the whole world kill each other and to only worry about us here at home.

    I realize that 100,000 have been killed over there and probably 1000’s of children but suddenly when chemical weapons kills 1400 including hundreds of children its a big deal. Not mention you’ve got people starving to death in other parts of the world that could easily be fed well for much less than we spend bombing our enemies. But where should the line be drawn? At what point is it justified to get involved?

    Part of the problem here is the whole alteration of the definition of war, like it or not a war has been being fought a very long time way before Iraq and Afghanistan. Iraq and Afghanistan in the broader scope of things are just battle’s within this on going war that I speak of. I wish it really was just that simple to leave the rest of the world alone, but the way I see we’ve played a big role in being an aggressor fighting for an over balance of power that nobody really should have. And this is coming from somebody that believes that a lot of the chaos is the result of something that we’ve enabled and helped transpire in the form of arming nations that we know full well are just going to kill each other.

    I don’t know what the right answer is but I have 2 kids myself that one day I hope I’ll still be able to support military service as an honorable thing as I do today. Just like everybody else I worry about the consequences of our actions and what the world tomorrow is going to be like because of them.

    I’ve tried my best to look at the whole thing from both angles and it just seems so lose/lose no matter what we do. I fully understand why people would suggest to leave it be after all the complexity of the situation and us lobbing a few cruise missile’s could escalate into world war 3. If we do nothing now, at what point should we do something?

    At the end of the day no matter how much you sugar coat it, the entire world is jacked up!

    #11869

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Yes, jacked up… That’s why we prep right?

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