Safely felling trees

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  ICF_Hooligan 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #1191

    ICF_Hooligan
    Member

    Fire… the original alternative energy. It’s a great idea to stock up on SOME firewood even if you do not have a proper fireplace, just in case. But can you find enough “downed” timber to prepare a suitable stockpile? probaby not…

    So you’ll probably have to fell some of your own trees. NOT the safest thing in the world, even for professionals… so here’s a nice video to help you have at least a minimal amount of knowledge before starting to cut.

    believe me, a 20′ apple tree seems easy enough until it starts falling towards your house… a great “pucker” moment!

    [video=youtube_share;Wj1d85CLDOQ]http://youtu.be/Wj1d85CLDOQ[/video]

    #11599

    Andrew
    Moderator

    Good video. My dad taught me this stuff when I was young. We grew up with wood stoves and went woodcutting more then I ever wanted.

    #11601

    ICF_Hooligan
    Member

    lots of people think ya just walk up and start cutting… “jeez, how hard can it be with a chainsaw” lol

    definitely info that isn’t just “common sense”. trees aren’t logical when they’re falling and cutting away a wedged branch can be a life affirming/changing/ending experience…

    #11598

    azurevirus
    Member

    Im with Andrew, growing up in upstate NY we burned wood at the farm every winter..and I hated cutting down the hardwood trees, limbing them then blocking then splitting and ranking it..you have to handle wood so many times to get it from the field into the basement and then to the furnance..specially when your working in 12-16″ of snow..man I hated that..work at the shop all day and spend the wkends getting wood in

    #11600

    Andrew
    Moderator

    We never cut wood in the snow. We had to drive about 40-50 miles to ge the wood then haul it home unload, stack and cover with tarp. You have to let it sit for a year or two and dry so that it doesn’t smoke up the house from all the pitch and moisture in it. We had ALOT of wood.

    I did have to split wood in the winter some times. We often underestimated how long the winter would be and how much wood we would need. This resulted in a shortage of presplit wood so we would have to split more.

    #11602

    froglegs888
    Member

    I have a Stihl saw with a bent handle from a large maple tree that fell the wrong way….tree was even roped…. sigh…at least the saw still runs:)

    #11597

    DCortez
    Member

    I’ve killed a saw, overheated in summer I guess, bent a couple of bars, and ruined multiple chains.

    Have had lots of luck with no injuries, although I did get whacked in the head with a branch once, hardhat saved me a stitch or 20.

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