To brake or not to brake

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  otis302 3 years ago.

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  • #1962

    otis302
    Member

    I have been trying various parts and pieces on my AR now I am considering a brake/flash hider I have read every thing I can on it the pros it keeps muzzle climb down and recoil low the cons is it will make you or any one else around deaf or close to it also some of them look pretty cool but my main concern is will it affect accuracy or velocity I will not compromise them at all.[ATTACH=CONFIG]2119[/ATTACH]

    #17460

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Maybe I’m incorrect here, but I would think with all of the testing that the military has done since the release of the M16 the modern rifle is probably using a decent brake. Maybe look up some images of some seals or delta online and take a good look at their rifles if you have not already or have not met any in person.

    That photo above does have some interesting designs.

    #17453

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    The military’s and the standard you find on many A2+ rifles is a flash hider. Its design to limit the amount of flash projected down range and also control the muzzle blast from kicking up dirt when firing prone.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

    #17462

    Andrew
    Moderator

    @otis302 17899 wrote:

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]2119[/ATTACH]

    That is an awesome image.

    #17457

    otis302
    Member

    After more research I think a brake is not the way to go I foud out there is a suppressor which is a flash hider a compensator which has the best of both worlds hides the flash slightly limits muzzle climb and the evel brake which I also learned is mostly used on the larger calibers to save your shoulder to be continued

    #17454

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    This for a 5.56 rifle? I do believe (not certain) I read that AR15’s with suppressors generally need a heavier buffer due to increased back pressure which can cause malfunctions in cycling. In Texas I think the tax stamp for a suppressor is $200.

    Let us know what your research reveals.

    #17458

    otis302
    Member

    You right Tek I miss under stood or did not read right its a silencer and you need the stamp maybe I read flash suppressor?

    #17455

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    $200 to the ATF probably time waiting thing for approval involved too.

    #17463

    firemedic4
    Member

    Have you considered a compensator? As of today all of the above are illegal in NY!

    #17456

    TeknaBuzz
    Keymaster

    Otis,

    This weekend I got a chance to try out a rifle equipped with the LANTAC Dragon compensator although I just watched and didn’t take em up of the offer to try. It did seem to reduce muzzle rise but it’s extremely loud. I think it all depends on what your looking for, from what I seen I think it would enable you to make more accurate shots, especially quick follow up shots.

    But like I said, it’s extremely loud I noticed significant difference through my hearing protection and I’m pretty sure one shot without would cause hearing damage.

    Personally I don’t want my rifle to be so loud that I hurt my ears if I need to pick it up and use it quick without taking the time to use hearing protection such as in a defensive situation. But depending on what your looking for my friend Dustin at roughneck sells them and is the one that did the demo for me LANTAC Dragon DGN556B Muzzle Brake – in stock $125.99

    #17459

    otis302
    Member

    Tek on my YHM 5c2 Phantom is a combo the best of both worlds I noticed it took that “thump” out of it, Brakes vent the shot bake to you to reduce recoil also the shooter to either side gets a blast. And I think there are so many designs dozens, they do so many different things the direction. the size and the # of ports x the barrel length. I made my decision as I always do either through actual triai and error or good old You tube

    #17464

    ShooterMike
    Member

    This is a fairly old thread, and I abhor necroing…but what the heck. :rolleyes:

    I’m a new member hereabouts. But I am an old competition shooter (USPSA/IPSC, IDPA, 3-gun) and AR hunter, so I have a fairly significant amount of experience in the topic of this thread. Read it for what it’s worth. Or just ignore it. 😎

    To clarify the way I use these terms I offer this short “code” and descriptions:

    Flash hider – aka flash suppressor, birdcage. Any muzzle device intended to suppress the flash from the end of the barrel while firing. Usually has little or no affect on recoil. May slightly reduce perceived noise to the shooter.

    Muzzle brake – aka compensator, comp, brake. A muzzle device that redirects escaping gases from the muzzle to counteract the forces of recoil by pushing forward, and sometimes downward, on the firearm at the muzzle. These invariably increase the flash and noise compared to a flash hider.

    This is one of the most misunderstood topics for AR shooters who haven’t tried all or most of the designs available. New designs seem to hit the market fairly often, and the marketers have been known to use confusing terms and incomplete information to further blur and confuse the topic.

    Some brakes reduce the flash signature slightly compared to a bare muzzle. But most brakes increase the flash signature compared to a bare muzzle. Some to a great degree. Typically, the more effective a brake is at reducing recoil, the more flash and noise you get. This is a simple consequence of redirecting hot gasses against walls in the comp to push forward, then venting those gasses 90 degrees out the sides of the comp. It gives the unburned powder and hot gasses a somewhat confined area to further ignite and produce a more voluminous pressurized blast, and it redirects sound back closer to the shooter.

    The way I view it, if your primary goal is to reduce muzzle movement (recoil and muzzle climb) AND you will never be firing the weapon without hearing protection, the compensator is desirable. This typically describes competition or range-only uses, and some controlled hunting situations. However, if the firearm is going to be used for defensive or tactical purposes, the goal should be to reduce noise and flash, and deal with whatever recoil there is.

    Just my thoughts. Feel free to disagree. YMMV.

    #17461

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Good point Mike. I think you are right, many people misunderstand that fact!

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