What you consider to be the most important item for survival equipment

Home Forums Gear & Equipment What you consider to be the most important item for survival equipment

This topic contains 42 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by  Carl Padilla 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 43 total)
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  • #3080

    Mudinyeri
    Member

    @Tom Firmingham 653 wrote:

    BERKEY water filters are nice and not too expensive BUT they work very well and I agree water is what we need the quickest (way before food)

    Berkey makes, arguably, the best filters on the market. Check out my DIY Family Water Filter for a less expensive way to take advantage of the Berkey filters without paying for their fancy containers.

    Personally, I think the most important thing that I have – that would help me survive – is my brain. I know, that’s not a piece of gear, but it supersedes any/all gear. Gear can be lost, stolen or wear out. My brain will be with me as long as I’m alive. It’s the combination of my mindset and knowledge that makes my survival – more so than any single piece of gear.

    #3082

    BugOutReview
    Member

    Water purification for sure, a body can go for quite some time with out food but no where near as long with out water.

    #3083

    Darkknight
    Member

    Well after Handgun, Knife and water filter, the most important equipment has to be Fire starter, Especially in wildness. but in terms of Versatility it has to Tomahawk, it can serve as defense, outdoor and hunting tools.

    #3084

    vbreferee
    Member

    I agree with all the posts. After guns and knives water purification, and fire starter. Rule of three: water filter, iodine tablets, bleach. I might add a metal container i.e. canteen, water bottle to boil in. Plastic is possible, but difficult. Fire starter: lighter, matches, flint & magnesium.

    #3091

    Richard Dupp
    Member

    @Texas Twitch 1521 wrote:

    I’m torn between some sort of water purification and a form of fire-starting, whether it be a steel, magnesium, or a good old Bic.

    Fire starter. With a fire you can make safe drinking water by boiling it.

    #3085

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Water (from storage, purification methods or whatever) and First Aid Kit. Everything else can be dealt with. Plus, if all I have is water for the next 30 days and no food I can lose some of that weight I’ve been wanting to lose.

    #3090

    Jhrdwyn
    Member

    For me, in the order I’d want them:

    • Water Purification
    • Knife
    • Fire Kit
    • Wool Blanket
    • Parachute Cord
    • First Aid Supplies
    • Compass
    • Small Mess Kit

    Water I have to have, a knife can be used to make a bow/arrow and for other items…but a knife *can* be made; if you’ve never considered this check:

    http://www.wilderness-survival.net/weapons-2.php

    It’s good to know just in case you lose your own or your B/O pack

    Fire starter, as I said I like steel wool & battery, but do practice making a friction fire.

    Wool will keep me warm even if it gets wet, can be used for various things including pack/shelter/hammock/etc.

    Parachute Cord is (IMO) a must for any B/O bag and/or adding to belt/pocket in the event you lose the bag. Can be used as a bow-drill friction fire-making kit, and can also help in shelter construction and a variety of other needs.

    FAK is a must but you *can* get by if you know wild crafting.

    I’d like a compass but I can read the sun position, etc. Also a must need skill

    Small mess kit is great for boiling water, food prep (hot) but it’s a luxury vs being needful; but the *most* important thing IMO is control – control the fear, insist on living through what ever, know that you can always get *more* so fighting over a B/O bag, etc is not worth your life. She who runs and lives, lives to run another day LOL

    #3095

    doulos
    Member

    Water purification. Here’s how we did it. Stole this from a video on YouTube.

    Sawyer makes a water bottle that has a filter that is guaranteed for 1 million gallons. The bottle is about $35 on Amazon.

    Then, we bought three Platypus bags from Amazon, one bigger and the other two the same size. We use the bigger Platypus bag for dirty water. We cut the end off of the attached hose for the bigger bag and ran it straight into the Sawyer filter. Ran the tube from the bottom of the Sawyer filter into each of the smaller Platypus bags for fresh water. In our setup, we can have 1.8L of clean water per person ready to go with 2.0L of dirty water to carry with us that can be filtered later.

    Might not be the fastest setup, but it only takes a few minutes to fill one of our Platypus bags through the filter. Light, easy and works really, really well.

    #3096

    scottishhog
    Member

    I think Jhrdwyn said it best, it’s good to have alot of things with you, but the knowledge and skills that you should acquire and practice are more valuable than anything you could lose/have stolen. A knife is obviously the most important tool to have. A gun is useless without lots of ammo, but a knife can help you aquire anything else you may need. But after a knife I see a tool to help with fire and a basic easy shelter a tarp works well but a wool blanket is better.

    #3098

    sickboy
    Member

    Water filter/purification hands down. Then fire-starting implements. I like Katadyn for the first, various for the second.

    #3097

    ICF_Hooligan
    Member

    fire starting devices… lots of them…

    #3099

    shottist
    Member

    If there’s hostiles in the area, fire is a no-no. the lower 48 states is about 4 million square miles, and if shtf, there won’t be a damned thing preventing 20 million or more Mexicans from coming up here. So, 320 million people, divided by 4 million square miles, is 80 people per square mile. a square mile is 640 acres, and an acre is like 220 ft by 200 ft. That means that every 4 acres, there’s potentially at least one enemy. Sure, about 1/3rd of our population are kids or old people, and women aint much of a threat, and half the men will have no gun, or not know how to use one, but it’s still many potential enemies within SMELLING distance of your fire, and scores if not hundreds can see the flames at night, or the smoke in daylight. a wool blanket, when wet, weighs over 20 lbs. Drying one out, with hot stones and the sun, is likely to take you more than one day, too. For a BOB, I go with velcro-edged, “heavy-duty” space blanket, with the right clothing on as I sleep and a silk “bag-liner” for my sleeping gear, with a pair of military ponchos and a nylon string hammock to provide shelter. Install grommets on the edges of the ponchos, and velcro down one side, so that they can be assembled and tossed over a suspended cord, to form a tent.

    #3092

    Andrew
    Moderator

    @shottist 12588 wrote:

    For a BOB, I go with velcro-edged, “heavy-duty” space blanket, with the right clothing on as I sleep and a silk “bag-liner” for my sleeping gear, with a pair of military ponchos and a nylon string hammock to provide shelter. Install grommets on the edges of the ponchos, and velcro down one side, so that they can be assembled and tossed over a suspended cord, to form a tent.

    That sounds very functional. Do you have or are you willing to share pictures of your set up? I am sure there are many members that would benefit from seeing your setup.

    #3100

    shottist
    Member

    the poncho thing is right out of the Army Survival manual. the Velcroed Space blanket/bag is simplicity itself, altho the velcroed on “hood” and drawstring are a bit of a pita to create.

    #3093

    Andrew
    Moderator

    @shottist 12626 wrote:

    the poncho thing is right out of the Army Survival manual. the Velcroed Space blanket/bag is simplicity itself, altho the velcroed on “hood” and drawstring are a bit of a pita to create.

    I will have to look it up. I have FM 21-76 but will download the newer 3-05.70. I am still interested in pictures of your setup if you are willing to share.

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