Your 2013 Garden

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This topic contains 35 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  PhilTheBiker 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #1228

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Have you started planning a garden for 2013?

    I have. In 2012 I canned more than 3 gallons of cucumbers! I had a single cherry tomato plant all in a 3 foot by 6 foot space in a flower bed at my row home. In 2013 I’m planning on having four 4 foot by 60 foot raised beds at my new home in PA. I’m going to be trying out this square foot garden method. That is my plan so far.

    I know for sure I want to try and grow
    Carrots, Big Tomatoes and Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Corn, Peas, Green/Red peppers, Strawberries, Raspberries, maybe some watermelon. I was also thinking of planting a few blue berry plants but that’s still up in the air. I don’t care much for squash or zucchini.

    I’m also going to try to get some laying hens for eggs.

    So, what’s your plan for 2013? Do you have a garden? If so are you going to try to expand it?

    #11981

    azurevirus
    Member

    I never gardened bedore and dont really relish the thought of it honestly..but do to ever rising food costs, and the uncertainty of being permitted to garden in the future yrs and the need to know how to grow a garden is 3 good reasons to give it a shot..I will try canning also for the first time

    #11982

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    @azurevirus 8953 wrote:

    I never gardened bedore and dont really relish the thought of it honestly..but do to ever rising food costs, and the uncertainty of being permitted to garden in the future yrs and the need to know how to grow a garden is 3 good reasons to give it a shot..I will try canning also for the first time

    Great! I’m going to make a photo gallery of my experience from start to finish. If I can get involved with raising rabbits I hope to grow enough food to also feed some animals. I’m pretty sure with four 4×60 foot garden beds I should be able to grow enough food to feed my wife, me, and a few animals plus I might even have some to sell. Road side stand? I donno.

    Oh, and I want to add Onions to my list. Maybe try to find that walla walla sweet onion

    Carrots, Big Tomatoes and Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Corn, Peas, Green/Red peppers, Strawberries, Raspberries, maybe some watermelon.

    That’s my list so far. I really hope the seeds I harvested from my cherry tomato plant and cucumber plants will grow next year. I’ve never harvested seeds before but from the 20+ cucumber plants I harvested 80+ seeds from a few of the cucumbers. I could of harvested hundreds, if not thousands, but I figured 24 plants generated way more cucumbers than I could eat so 80 would generate even more cucumbers that I can feed to some rabbits, sell, give, or can.

    #12001

    darksmith
    Member

    Garden next year will definitely focus on items that can be canned.
    I was able to can some delicious Golden Glow pickles from the overripe cucumbers I chose not to try and eat last year. I had a hard time keeping up with the garden (newborn baby @ home), but will try to do better this year. Will have carrots, onions, cukes, tomatoes, beets, squash for sure, still working on my list. Interested in growing plenty of those and may focus on getting lots of those items laid away, because they are our favorites. Pole beans also a possibility.

    #12000

    Cowgirl
    Member

    I love gardening. I actually have a Master Gardener certificate. 😎

    I intend to garden in 2013, but …. I don’t know if I will move before the start of gardening season. So, I am a little hesitant about making my plans. I HOPE that we are able to buy and move in the next few months, but I have been hoping for that for awhile – too long. Still, if all goes well, I have my eye on a little house on about 5 acres with EXCELLENT soil, a decent sized pole barn, and some fencing. The soil is so good, the DH noticed, and he’s not nearly into gardening like me. If we manage to buy it, there will definitely be a nice garden in 2013!

    #11983

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    @cowgirl 8986 wrote:

    I love gardening. I actually have a Master Gardener certificate. 😎

    I intend to garden in 2013, but …. I don’t know if I will move before the start of gardening season. So, I am a little hesitant about making my plans. I HOPE that we are able to buy and move in the next few months, but I have been hoping for that for awhile – too long. Still, if all goes well, I have my eye on a little house on about 5 acres with EXCELLENT soil, a decent sized pole barn, and some fencing. The soil is so good, the DH noticed, and he’s not nearly into gardening like me. If we manage to buy it, there will definitely be a nice garden in 2013!

    You could grow a few tomato plants and put them in transportable pots. If you move before the last frost you’ll not need to worry about it. Good luck!

    #11984

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    So a few things have happened since I posted this last post. Christmas!!

    My wife bought me a few books. The old farmers almanac, but also a book call “The Quarter Acre Garden“.

    The book as set out some ideas as to how I want to lay out my garden and some more ideas on what to plant. I’ve also been thinking about how I could do a green house, but I don’t think that’s a project I’ll be able to take on this year.

    And then my wife hit me hard. She told me that the snow doesn’t go away until after february. That it just lingers on the ground for months in Western PA. I’ve never lived in a location that was like that. Every place I’ve ever lived the snow eventually melts away for a week or two before the next snow fall. I’m going to have to make some serious plans for this next year.

    Anyone else live in a colder weather environment and grow?

    #11977

    Gigabelly
    Member

    I have been gardening for several years. From a survival standpoint, I cannot stress enough the importance of choosing heirloom seeds. In case you don’t know the difference, most of your seeds you buy in the store are hybrids. They are prolific and do really well, but only for one or two generations. In other words, if you couldn’t get any more seeds, the seeds from your hybrid plants that you have now will only regenerate for a few generations. Then they will be sterile or will regress back to one of the parent strains that was used to make the hybrid. Heirlooms, however, will regenerate every year if the seeds are harvested and stored properly. They can produce every year. They are not, however, as prolific as their hybrid cousins. That is one of the traits that are bred into the hybrids. So, you will need to plant more but you will be able to harvest the seeds ad infinitum.

    #11985

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    @gigabelly 9733 wrote:

    I have been gardening for several years. From a survival standpoint, I cannot stress enough the importance of choosing heirloom seeds. In case you don’t know the difference, most of your seeds you buy in the store are hybrids. They are prolific and do really well, but only for one or two generations. In other words, if you couldn’t get any more seeds, the seeds from your hybrid plants that you have now will only regenerate for a few generations. Then they will be sterile or will regress back to one of the parent strains that was used to make the hybrid. Heirlooms, however, will regenerate every year if the seeds are harvested and stored properly. They can produce every year. They are not, however, as prolific as their hybrid cousins. That is one of the traits that are bred into the hybrids. So, you will need to plant more but you will be able to harvest the seeds ad infinitum.

    I completely agree with you on this point. I’ve been looking at this as much as possible.

    Just wondering, if you plant a row of hybrid tomatoes (for the higher volumes of fruit) and on the other side of the garden (to attempt to reduce the chance of cross pollination) the heirloom seeds simply so you can harvest fresh seeds every year. Will that work?

    And hybrid seeds are not genetically engineered are they? or is that a mixed bag question?

    #11975

    DCortez
    Member

    Just received an order of heirloom seeds and will start building raised beds soon.

    #11978

    Gigabelly
    Member

    Hybrids are, by definition, genetically modified. However, by todays standards, that term has different connotations. Hybrids are essentially engineered by breeding qualities into the offspring. This was started by a French Monk named Mendel with peas. Not that it doesn’t occur in nature without mans assistance, but if it does it is just due to the proximity of the plants. Anyway, I digress…

    In todays vernacular, Genetically Modified means that the genetics of the plant were spliced in a lab. That is a true GMO.

    To answer your question, you can mix your hybrids and your heirlooms. If you store seeds for a TEOTWAKI event, make sure they are heirlooms. We grow heirlooms and save the seeds to save money but to a greater degree, to learn how to harvest and save seeds. Heirlooms wont do you a lot of good if you don’t know how to save the seeds. It is really very easy for tomatoes, but other stuff is harder. Like lettuce or cabbage. Some stuff only produces seed every other year. This is a good example of why it is good to learn to garden now, before you depend on your garden to feed you. It takes time to learn all this stuff and stuff often goes wrong….drought, bugs, coons, your own chickens, etc….

    #11999

    ICF_Hooligan
    Member

    the one thing that will definitely be added is kale… i’ve been juicing these days and kale is like a supernutrient veg… can’t live without it!

    #11979

    Gigabelly
    Member

    Kale is awesome. In the winter months, sprouting is a great idea.

    #11986

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    Kale.. Hummm you are not the first person to recommend it to me. I might consider it. I’ve been thinking of various greens hat I can grow. I figure whatever I don’t like I’ll feet to a rabbit once I get them.

    #11987

    PhilTheBiker
    Moderator

    I came across the following link about getting your 2013 garden ready. Seems to be a good read! Enjoy. Let me know if you found anything interesting in the article that you are not already doing, that you already do, or that you want to try.

    The ‘add organic matter now’ section seems a little odd. At my home in PA (garden is not ready yet) there is still snow on the ground 🙂

    http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/2012/09/11/preparing-the-garden-for-next-year-4-steps-to-take-now-for-a-great-2013-garden/

    I’ve also been reading where people are talking about starting your seeds for transplant plants now. I imagine in southern warmer states this is probably accurate. I would think for northern states we might need to wait a few more weeks.

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